part 5

What Is ‘Architectural Identity’? Part IV

Stadium interior © minmud

 

Architecture has one main purpose and one only, to serve the needs of man. This could take on different forms, from the typical residential homes of individuals and families, office towers for businesses and corporations, shops for services and goods and so on. The point of architecture is to create inhabitable spaces for which can be occupied for whatever its main use is. How a building impacts an individual or a number of people depends on it as a whole, how does it work? How does it look? How long will it last? How does it improve my life? All these questions and more can greatly influence how a building is designed, constructed, funded, ultimately it can influence the very lifespan of a project, from concept design to completion. Looking towards the Tokyo Olympic 2020 stadium, how will it impact the general public? How will it affect the local residents, the city and the world in the long-run?

The stadium proposal seems adamant on making the building more flexible beyond the Olympic events, creating a venue that is more people-friendly and engaging, that can host various artistic and cultural events as well as benefiting the local district, the city and by extension, the country. With the built-in exhibition centre (a la Zaragoza Bridge Pavilion style), the stadium proposal tries to be more than just a sporting stadium, that it can adapt to the times and various possible functions. No doubt when the structure is completed that it will look stupendous and extravagant. Will it outshine the previous stadiums and ceremonies? Most definitely. With the whole Olympic festivities will bring to Japan a wealth of economic income and several hundreds of thousands tourists in.  The memorable event will give Japan the biggest global sporting competition stage (ignoring the FIFA World Cup), grabbing the world’s attention. The human factor when dealing with the Olympics is almost indescribable. Being there physically and taking part in the festivities and sporting events creates memorable moments in people, both local and visiting. Architecture, which has over the years been not just design, but also a form of communication and narrative in society, shaping our urban landscapes, defining our society in ways that are obvious and oblivious to us. Buildings have a way of becoming a small or big part of our lives, whether its somewhere we visited on holiday and remember fondly, a place where we first met our spouses, the first family home where all the kids grew up in, the same bar we go to every Friday night with our friends, whatever the situation, buildings tend to touch and influence us in the most peculiar ways sometimes.

Will Zaha Hadid’s proposal be a positive impact on the populace, not just during the Olympics but more importantly, afterwards? How will the legacy of the Games affect people 5, 10, 20 years after? We’ll just have to wait and see. In the meantime, examples of buildings that have that ‘human impact’ factor include: the wonderfully vivid and artsy Parc Guell, the botanic paradise that is known as the Gardens by the Bay, the highest of the high monolith Burj Khalifa, France’s most recognised structure, the Eiffel Tower and the beautiful existing structures found within the city of Petra, particularly the Al Khazneh.

 

Picture source: http://www.worldofdesigners.com
Picture source: http://www.worldofdesigners.com

Name: Parc Guell

Location: Barcelona, Spain

Architects: Antoni Gaudi

Date: 1900-14

 

Picture source: http://cdn.nanxiongnandi.com
Picture source: http://cdn.nanxiongnandi.com

Name: Gardens by the Bay

Location: Marina Bay, Singapore

Architects: Wilkinson Eyre Architects 

Date: 2012

 

Picture source: www.dubaidhow.com
Picture source: www.dubaidhow.com

Name: Burj Khalifa

Location: Dubai, UAE

Architects: Adrian Smith of SOM

Date: 2004-2010

 

Picture source: http://www.wallpaperswala.com
Picture source: http://www.wallpaperswala.com

Name: Eiffel Tower

Location: Paris, France

Architect/Engineers: Stephen Sauvestre/Gustav Eiffel, Maurice Koechlin and Émile Nouguier

Date: 2004-2010

 

 

Picture source: http://static.panoramio.com
Picture source: http://static.panoramio.com

Name: Al Khazneh

Location: Petra, Jordan

Architects: N/A

Date: 2012